//
you're listening to...
Emo, German (Deutsch), Germany (Deutschland), Pop, Punk, Rock

“Durch den Monsun” (Tokio Hotel)

Country: GERMANY
Language: GERMAN (DEUTSCH)
Genre: POP, ROCK, EMO, PUNK

GUITAR CHORDS:
Verse: E / C / E / C / E / C / Am / G (second time: Asus4 / A)
Chorus: C / D / Em / Bm / C / D / Bm / Em / Cmaj7 / D
Second Chorus Ending: Em / Bm / Cmaj7 / D
Bridge: Esus 4  E / Csus4 C and then E / Cmaj7

“Durch den Monsun”

das Fenster öffnet sich nicht mehr
hier d(a)rin ist es voll von dir und leer
und vor mir geht die letzte Kerze aus

ich warte schon (ei)ne Ewigkeit
endlich ist es jetzt soweit
da draußen zieh(e)n die schwarzen Wolken auf

ich muss durch den Monsun, hinter die Welt,
ans Ende der Zeit bis kein Regen mehr fällt
gegen den Sturm am Abgrund entlang
und wenn ich nicht mehr kann, denk(e) ich daran
irgendwann laufen wir zusammen
durch den Monsun, dann wird alles gut

(ei)n halber Mond versinkt vor mir
war der eben noch bei dir
und hält er wirklich was er mir verspricht

ich weiss, dass ich dich finden kann
Hör(e) deinen Namen im Orkan
ich glaub(e) noch mehr dran glauben kann ich nicht

ich muss durch den Monsun, hinter die Welt,
ans Ende der Zeit bis kein Regen mehr fällt
gegen den Sturm am Abgrund entlang
und wenn ich nicht mehr kann, denk(e) ich daran
irgendwann laufen wir zusammen
weil uns einfach nichts mehr halten kann durch den Monsun

Hey! Hey!
ich kämpf mich durch die Mächte, hinter dieser Tür
werde sie besiegen und dann führn sie mich zu dir
dann wird alles gut…

“THROUGH THE MONSOON” (Original English Translation by ORS, 2012)

The window does not open anymore
here inside it is full of you and empty
and before me the last candle goes out

I’m waiting already an eternity
finally it is now the time
there outside the black clouds are coming out

I must go through the monsoon, beyond the world
to the end of time until no rain falls anymore
against the storm, along the abyss
and if I can’t  do any more, I’ll think about it
at some time we run together
through the monsoon, and then all will be good

A half moon sinks before me
was it just now by you?
and does it really hold what it promises me?

I know that I can find you
I know your name in the hurricane
I believe I can’t believe in it anymore

I must go through the monsoon, beyond the world
to the end of time until no rain falls anymore
against the storm, along the abyss
and if I can’t  do any more, I’ll think about it
at some time we’ll run together
because it can’t stop us so easily anymore
through the monsoon

Hey! Hey!
I fight myself through the power, behind this door
I will defeat them and then they lead me to you
then all will be good

Vocabulary and Etymology

nicht mehr – no more, not anymore
darin – there in
ausgehen – to go out
Kerze (f) – candle; related to Dutch kaars
Ewigkeit (f) – eternity; adjective ewig (eternal); related to Dutch eeuwig
endlich – finally, in the end
soweit – so far
da draußen – over there
ausziehen – to pull out, to come out
müssen – to have to; often understood by context to mean “to have to go
Monsun (m) – monsoon; defined as a seasonal reversing wind, from Arabic  mawsim (موسم “season”).
Abgrund (m) – abyss; related to Dutch afgrond
entlang – along
können – to be able to; often understood by context  to mean “to able to do”
daran – on it, about it
dann – and then (time sequence); not to be confused with denn (for, because, then, so)
eben noch – just now
versprechen – to promise
Orkan (m) – hurricane; defined as a high-intensity tropical cyclone storm system, from Portuguese furação
noch – even, ever, again
einfach – simple; simply, just
Macht (f) – power, might; related to Dutch macht
besiegen – to defeat

Grammar and Other Notes

Dropping Understood Verbs 

In German, it is possible to drop verbs when the meaning is understood by context.  Usually, if the second verb in the compound verbal phrase conveys a general motion or action, it can be dropped, leaving only the Modal Verb behind.  A great example of this feature is in the first line of the chorus of “Durch den Monsun”:

“ich muss durch den Monsun”

Literally, “I must through the monsoon”, it is understood that the verb “to go” has been omitted, although it is still possible to make a more complete sentence as well:

“ich muss durch den Monsun gehen” (I must through the monsoon go –> I must go through the monsoon)

Here are some other examples using Modal Verbs.

müssen (must) : Ich muss nach Amerika      I must (go) to America.
wollen (want) : Ich will nach Hause              I want (to go) home.
sollen (should) : Was soll ich dort?               What should I (do) there?
dürfen (may): Ich darf es nicht.                       I am not allowed (to do) it.
können (can) : Kannst du English?               Can you (do/handle –> speak) English?
mögen (would like): Ich möchte zu Herrn/Frau Soundso.         I would (to speak) to Mr./Mrs. So-and-so.

This site does a good job of explaining Modal Verbs, including other examples of dropping the 2nd verb.


Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: