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France, French (Français), Latin Popular, Reggae, Spain (España/Espanya), Spanish (Español/Castellano)

“Me gustas tú” (Manu Chao)

Live performance of “Me gustas tú” (YouTube)
Language: Spanish (Español), French (Français)
Country: Spain (España), France

File:Proxima Estacion Esperanza.jpg

“Me gustas tú”
Manu Chao
Próxima Estación: Esperanza

Que horas son, mi corazón

me gustan los aviones, me gustas tú.
me gusta viajar, me gustas tú.
me gusta la mañana, me gustas tú.
me gusta el viento, me gustas tú.
me gusta soñar, me gustas tu.
me gusta la mar, me gustas tu.

que voy a hacer,  je ne sais pas
que voy a hacer, je ne sais plus
que voy a hacer, je suis perdu
que horas son, mi corazón

me gusta la moto, me gustas tú.
me gusta correr, me gustas tú.
me gusta la lluvia, me gustas tú.
me gusta volver, me gustas tú.
me gusta marihuana, me gustas tú.
me gusta colombiana, me gustas tú.
me gusta la montaña, me gustas tú.
me gusta la noche, me gustas tú.

Me gusta la cena, me gustas tú.
me gusta la vecina, me gustas tú.
me gusta su cocina, me gustas tú.
me gusta camelar, me gustas tú.
me gusta la guitarra, me gustas tú.
me gusta el regaee, me gustas tú.

me gusta la canela, me gustas tú.
me gusta el fuego, me gustas tú.
me gusta menear, me gustas tú.
me gusta La Coruña, me gustas tú.
me gusta Malasaña, me gustas tú.
me gusta la castaña, me gustas tú.
me gusta Guatemala, me gustas tú.

“I like you” (English translation by ORS, 2011)

What time is it, my heart

I like planes, I like you
I like to travel, I like you
I like the morning, I like you
I like the wind, I like you
I like to dream, I like you
I like the sea, I like you

What am I going to do, I don’t know
What am I going to do, I don’t know anymore
What am I going to do, I’m lost
What time is it, my heart

I like motorcycles, I like you
I like to run, I like you
I like the rain, I like you
I like to return, I like you
I like marijuana, I like you
I like colombian, I like you
I like the mountain, I like you
I like the night, I like you

I like dinner, I like you
I like the neighbor lady, I like you
I like her cooking, I like you
I like to sweet-talk, I like you
I like guitar, I like you
I like reggae, I like you

I like cinnamon, I like you
I like the fire, I like you
I like to shake, I like you
I like La Coruña, I like you
I like Malasaña, I like you
I like chestnut, I like you
I like Guatemala, I like you


Vocabulary

Mar – sea; sometimes masculine (el mar), sometimes in literature and idiomatic expressions feminine (la mar); from Latin mare (sea); related to Port. o mar, Ital il mare, Fr. La mer

Colombiana – Columbian; could be a noun (female Colombian) or an adjective in reference to marihuana in previous line; it has been suggested that Colombiana refers to the brand of soft drink (kola champagne) in Colombia

Camelar – to make sweet-talk

Menear – to wag (tail), shake, wiggle, fidget; in Port. Menear, related to French mener (to take, lead somewhere), Itallian menare (to deliver, fight)

La Coruña – city aka A Coruña in Galicia, or the professional foodball club there

Malasaña – neighborhood in Madrid famous for alternative/countercultural scene

Castaña (feminine) – chestnut; also used in slang for trouble, drunkenness, rubbish, etc; from Greek καστανον (kastanon), Latin castanea (chestnut), related to Ital. la castagna, Fr. la châtaigne (le marron), Port. a castanha

Grammar

1.  Gustarle , to please (someone)

Expressing “like” or “pleasure” is a fundamental part of all languages.  In most cases, this “liking” or “taking pleasure” fits into the SVO model, and the question is how to define these S, V, and O parts.

Take the example, “I like you”.  This phrase in English is distinctly Germanic.  The Subject (the “doer” in the Nominative case) actively “likes” an object (someone or something in the Accusative case).  Consider examples from other Germanic languages:

German: Ich mag dich / Ich liebe dich.
Dutch: ik mag je / Ik hou van jou
Norwegian: jeg liker deg
Swedish: jag gillar dig ; Jag tycker om dig
Danish: jeg kan lide dig

In the East Asia languages, as well, there is a similar conceptualization of “liking” but the order is SOV in Japanese and Korean.

Mandarin: 我喜欢你 (wo3 xi3xuan ni3)
Japanese: 私はあなたが(あなたのことが)好きです。(watashi-ha anata-ga suki desu)
Korean: 난 당신을 좋아해요 (nan tang-sin-eul choh-a hae-yo)

Among the Romance languages, however, the tendency is for the “liked” to “please” the “liker”; in other words, the word order is SOV and the pieces are rearranged:

French: tu me plais
Italian: tu me piace
Spanish: tú me gustas

Portuguese and Romanian are exception here:

Portuguese : Eu gusto de ti/você.
Romanian: Îme place de tine

Another examples:

Russian: Ты мне нравишься (Tiy mnye nravishsya) / Я тебя люблю (Ya tibya lyublyu)
2.  What time is it?  Qué hora es? Qué horas son?

In this song, it is supposed that Manu Chao is using a sub-standard form of the question “What time is it?” with the expression “Qué horas son?” instead of the more standard “Qué hora es?”.  The difference is simply a question of singular “hour” or “time” or the plural “hours”.

Here is the same question in other languages:

Portuguese: Que horas são? (What hours are they?)
French: Quelle heure est-il? (Which hour is it?)
Italian: Che ore sono? (What hours are they?)

Romanian: Ce timp este? (What time is it?)
German: Wie spät ist es? (How late is it?)
Dutch: Hoe laat is het? (How late is it?)
Danish/Norwegian: Hva tid er det? (What time is it?)
Swedish: Vad är klockan? (What are the clocks?)

Russian: Который час? (Which hour?)
Japanese: 何時ですか?(what time?)
Korean: 몇 시 예요? (what time?)

Chinese: 现在几点 (xian4zai4 ji1dian3) (now what time)

Guitar Chords:
Bm A Em Em

Discussion

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Gustar « Blog de Sidonia - February 18, 2012

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