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Canada (Québec), French (Français), Pop

“Fais ce que tu voudras” (Céline Dion)

“Fais ce que tu voudras” : Music video on Youtube

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“Fais ce que tu voudras”
Céline Dion
Les chansons en or (1986)

Si tu t’en vas
Tout sera vieux
Et la terre vivra sans nous

Je crois en toi
Et j’aimerais mieux
Qu’elle tourne avec nous

Fais ce que tu voudras
Fais ce que tu veux
Mais restes ici
Fais le chaud et le froid
Et si tu me laisses un peu de pluie
J’ai mon amour qui fait soleil

Je dors avec toi
Même si tu n’es pas là
Tu es mon rêve unique

Mon seul pays
Et mon seul ami
Et mon amour en musique

Fais ce que tu voudras
Fais ce que tu veux
Mais restes ici
Fais le chaud et le froid
Et si tu me laisses un peu de pluie
J’ai mon amour qui fait soleil

S’il faut se battre
Je me battrai aussi
Je jouerai ma vie
Ma dernière carte pour te garder

Fais ce que tu voudras
Fais ce que tu veux
Mais restes ici
Fais ton jouet de moi
Et si tu me laisses un peu de pluie
Mon amour changera mes nuits en soleil

“Do what you will” (Translation by ORS, 2010)

If you go
everything will turn old
and the earth will live without us
I believe in you
and I would prefer
that it turn with us

Do what you will
do whatever you want
but stay here
Make it hot and make it cold
and if you leave me a bit of rain
I’ve got my love that makes it sunny

I sleep with you
even if you’re not there
you are my only dream
my only country
and my only friend
and my love in music

If we have to fight
I will fight too
I will play my life
my last card to keep you

Do what you will
do whatever you want
but stay here
make me your plaything
and if you leave me a bit of rain
my love will turn my nights sunny
Vocabulary and Etymology:

1.  s’en aller – to leave, to go away; literally, “to go” with the pronoun en, which refers to some place from which one is going

2.  tout – everything (pronoun), not to be confused with the inflected adjective tout (masculine, singular; “all of the…”) and the adverb tout (“all, completely”)

3.  aimer mieux (que…) – to prefer (that); literally, “to love better”, usually followed by a subjunctive verb

4.  rester – to remain, to stay behind, as in le reste (“the rest, the remainder, the left-overs”) from the Latin restare (re + stare, to stand back); not to be confused with se reposer (“to take a rest”, with the Old English word rest)
5. même si – even if/though; même also used as an adjective to mean “the same…” (la même chose, the same thing) or “the very…” (même ici right here at this very spot); it is also used with object pronouns, such as moi-même (I myself) and même moi (even I), as in même moi, je ne peux pas… “even I can’t…”
6.  se battre – to fight (reflexive verb), from battre (to defeat, to beat, to beat eggs, to shuffle cards, etc), from Latin battuere, to beat/strike
7.  garder – to guard, keep, look after, protect
8.  le jouet – toy, from jouer (to play, risk, gamble) from Latin iocare (to joke, jest); related to It. giocare, Sp. jugar, Po. jogar.
Grammar
1. en
“Si tu t’en vas…” If you leave…(if you go away from here)
I have already written about en here with Francis Cabrel’s “je t’aimais, je t’aime, je t’aimerais”, but I would like to add some details.  Among its many meanings and uses in French, en is a tricky pronoun with stands in reference to usually something or someone from which or of which some action is occuring.  The key question you need to ask in French is, De quoi/qui…? If you can answer this question, then you can use en.
In this sense, en replaces nouns previously introduced (or at least referred to) by de, and translates as “some”, “any”, “of it/them”, “from it/them”, “from there”, etc.  The trick, then, is to learn the de/en verb phrases, such as avoir besoin de (to need, to have need for it) or s’en faire (to worry, to worry about it).
For reference, other uses of en include:
1.  preposition “in/to”  (with feminine regions): j’habite en France (I live in France), je vais en Australie en automne (I’m going to Australia in autumn)
2.  gerund “as/upon/while ~ing” : En attendant Godot (Samuel Beckett, 1952), translated as “Waiting for Godot”
2.  qui vs. que
“Fais ce que tu veux…”   Do what you want (to do)
“J’ai un amour qui fait soleil”   I have a love that makes it sunny
Both of these are relative pronouns which are something translated in English as the single that/which.  In French, however, there is a major distinction between qui (the subjective, the doer) and que (the object, the receiver).  For example,
The thing that is eating you…  –> la chose qui vous mange…
The thing that you are eating… –> la chose que vous mange…
In the first example with qui , “the thing” is the subject doing the eating of you.  In the second example with que, “the thing” is the object of your eating.
The other form of this is ce qui and ce que, but the same rules apply:
I don’t know what (that which) happened –> Je ne sais pas ce qui est arrivé
I don’t know what you want –> Je ne sais pas ce que tu veux
In the first example, ce qui is the subject or the supposed “events” which have occured.  In the second example, ce que is the object of whatever it is you “want”.
*ce que can be contracted to ce qu’ before vowels:
I don’t know what he wants  –> Je ne sais pas ce qu’il veut
Chords:
Intro/verse: E  B  C#m  A
E  B   A    A
Chorus:   E   C#m  Abm  Abm (2x)
Gbm-Gb-B
Break: D  G  Am  D
G   Am  C   B

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